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U.S. finally got a "good" on stem cell research

U.S. finally got a "good" on stem cell research

U.S. finally got a "good" on stem cell research

Until recently, the U.S. government could not determine the relationship to the study of embryonic stem cells. Now the U.S. Court of Appeals recognized the legitimacy of public funding of such research, says "Remedium".

This is a logical result of years of war, the National Institutes of Health and non-governmental organizations that oppose the use of embryonic cells for ethical reasons. According to Amy Comstock Rick, president of the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research, is a solution – a real victory.

However, three judges differently justified the decision, therefore, is likely to re-review the case. Recall: the first suit against the National Institutes of Health filed in 2009. This happened after the lifting of restrictions on embryonic stem cell research imposed by Bush.

Opponents studies referred to Dickey-Wicker Amendment, which prohibits government funding "research in which embryos are destroyed." Judge Royce Lamberth agreed with this and stated: executive authorities violated the amendment, therefore, is required to suspend the research.

Last April 2011 the court declared that Barack Obama, in theory can use public money to fund relevant research. During the last meeting of the Court confirmed: studies "use stem cells already extracted embryos, and we are not talking about destroying them." A search of balance in matters of bioethics – not the task of the court.