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n Britain successfully tested a DNA vaccine for leukemia

n Britain successfully tested a DNA vaccine for leukemia

December 11, 2012, 02:03 of Korrespondent.net
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In the course of the experiments also proved the safety of the vaccine
AP
Developed by scientists at the University of Southampton (England) DNA vaccine for leukemia has been successfully tested on patients with chronic leukemia, according to EurekAlert!.
Preliminary results of a Phase II clinical vaccine trials were presented in California at a scientific conference on DNA vaccines.
According to data presented at the conference, participated in the trial of 27 patients with chronic leukemia. While 14 patients received treatment as a DNA vaccine, and 13 served as controls.
The vaccine is aimed at suppressing the activity of a gene called Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1), increased expression of which is observed in cells of various types of cancer. WT1 encodes a protein of the same name – a transcription factor that is required for the development of the kidneys and ovaries or testes in the fetus.
In addition, the function of WT1 is involved in differentiation and apoptosis (programmed cell death) of cells.
In the drug-treated patients experienced the development of antibodies to the vaccine, as well as T-cell mediated immune response, including the activation of T-killers. In the course of the experiments also proved the safety of the vaccine.
Now, according to study leader Professor Christian Ottensmeyera begin vaccine trial involving patients with acute leukemia.
Volunteers, who will be a response to the vaccine will receive it in combination with electroporation (technology creating pores in the cell membrane that is used for the implementation of the cell DNA or RNA).
The study controlled generation of molecular markers of the disease, the level of expression of the gene WT1, and the survival rate of patients with acute leukemia. Research is conducted in hospitals in London, Southampton and Exeter.