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H1N1 influenza vaccine be safe for pregnant women

H1N1 influenza vaccine be safe for pregnant women

01/21/2013
Pregnant women who received the vaccine against the flu virus strain H1N1, have not shown an increased risk of miscarriage, according to a new study, a team of scientists from Norway.
In parallel, the experts found that pregnant women who have had influenza during gestation has traditionally had an increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirth, in connection with which the vaccine is recommended as a necessary means to protect the child.
Scientists from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health initiated its investigation after a pandemic influenza H1N1, which occurred in spring 2009 and autumn 2010. Based on the findings of the experts once again called on the women to get vaccinated, since no increased health risk, it will not be with you. However, across Europe has traditionally refused to be vaccinated pregnant, and in recent years this trend has become even more prevalent after several reports of miscarriages among women in France and Spain that occurred after they were vaccinated.
The study involved a total of about 8 million women living in different parts of Norway. Some of them received the vaccine, while the other part refused vaccinations. The study showed that influenza infection, including potentially life-the mother herself H1N1 strain increases the risk of fetal loss is about two times in comparison with the average figures. Influenza vaccination does not carry the same risks. Moreover, since the vaccine protects against influenza, a group of women who received vaccine miscarriage risk was even lower than the national average.
“It’s important to understand that vaccinations actually protect pregnant women against influenza, which can be harmful to both mother and child” – the authors of the study. “If pregnant women are concerned about the health of her fetus, immunizations they should definitely do it.”
However, we should recall that the new study is only one of many in a long line of disputes vaccine safety for women. Currently, there are already dozens of works that show a risk of various vaccines in terms of miscarriage and birth of children with autism. While dozens of other studies refute the existence of such risks. In medicine today it is difficult to find a more contentious and controversial topic, so independent experts advise still be avoided vaccines – at least for as long as the scientists themselves have not come to a consensus on the issue.